IO Wright’s Newest Project Makes ‘Our’ Presence Known

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IO Wright’s Newest Project Makes ‘Our’ Presence Known

IO Wright doesn’t tire easily. We’ve already covered her once, when her “Breedings” show opened at the Fuse Gallery in October.

Self-taught, she’s prolific and young and her black and white portraiture is stunning because somehow it’s quiet and loud; the lighting always smooth but the faces bright. Her pictures aren’t shocking because of the shocking content (which there is, not infrequently), but because the shots she gets contain details that are full, almost bursting at the seams, with secrets. You can see these secrets in the millisecond of a brow furrow that she captured.

She’s one of those great photographers who made her camera subtle and figured out how to peel back layers from her subjects until suddenly before you know it their most naked feelings and emotions and worries are exposed and on film.

This is the perfect skill to have for a project like Self-Evident Truths, which is her newest undertaking and is supported by the HRC. She’s photographing anyone who identifies with any part of “queer,” any letter on the LGBT spectrum. The picture will be part of a series of 3,0000 portraits and this huge collection of gay images will end up being featured at Coachella, the loved music festival out in California.  

April 1st at Washington Square Park and April 2nd at Cubana Social Club will be the next chances for queers in New York to roll through and take part. For more info, go here.

I got my picture taken during her first round of shoots and was impressed with not only Wright’s deftness at making a person as awkward as I am actually feel comfortable in front of a camera, but the full-on earnestness that she and her collaborators – Kashi Somers and Bianca Butti- feel for this project. “It is vital that we make our presence known,” is the project’s line, and it’s true. The more we’re seen, the more we’re known. Eventually, finally seen, maybe we can turn that into known and understood.